The Revelation Countdown

The first two nights of Passover are behind us, and perhaps we have escaped the narrow places in our lives. Or perhaps not. It’s hard to embrace freedom when we don’t know what’s ahead of us, and we are unaware of the wonder that awaits.

So we count. Count the Omer – the 49 days between Passover and Shavuot.
Count the hours between liberation and revelation.
Count the things we left behind so that we don’t forget.
Count the steps we take toward growing.
Count the people who come with us.
The arms around our shoulders.
The hands that find ours.
Count today. Count tomorrow.
Count the ones who make freedom feel more free.

For a daily Omer* meditation, follow Ritualwell – they are posting art and 200-character reflections each day. Mine will be posted on May 3/4, day 14 of the Omer, Malkhut she’b’Gvurah – sovereignty within boundaries. I’m proud to have contributed again to my favorite site for contemporary Jewish ritual and writing.

Happy Counting, Beloveds. May every journey bring you closer to the home inside of you.

*Each of the seven weeks between Passover and Shauvot are associated with an aspect of God’s soul – and our souls: Chesed (lovingkindness), Gevurah (judgment/boundaries), Tiferet (harmony), Hod (splendor), Netzach (endurance), Yesod (foundation) and Malkhut (sovereignty). Each day within each week is associate with one of these seven aspects as well. For example, day one of the Omer is Chesed within Chesed. Day Two is Gevurah (boundaries) within Chesed (lovingkindness). To read more about it, look here: https://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/introduction-counting-omer

Through the Narrows: Passover 5779

This Passover, I’m considering the narrow spaces* I create for myself – the chains I choose, and the chains I hold onto. I’m looking at the chains I should abandon, and the ones I can’t leave behind.

I’m thinking about the chains I carried with me across the riverbed, clink-clink-clinking like Miriam’s timbrels, while the sea roared on either side.

I’m thinking about dropping them along the way this time, releasing myself from the narrowness I’ve carried in my heart.

Whatever it is that’s holding you back, I invite you to wonder with me: What does freedom feel like, when we allow ourselves to truly feel it? What might we discover together in this great expanse?

Shabbat Shalom and Hag Sameach, Everyone.

May we sing each other, every day, to the other side of the sea

*The word for Egypt in Hebrew is “Mitzrayim,” which translates, roughly, to “narrow spaces.” When we celebrate Passover, we are asked to imagine that we ourselves are coming out of Egypt, freeing ourselves from the narrow places in our lives.